Growing Fruit Trees In Containers

pt (1)

I grew up in a cold place where it was impossible to grow fruit trees of any kind. I love fresh fruit and vegetables, and eat a lot of it. Sometimes it was even difficult to find a variety of fresh fruit in the grocery store, and it was always very expensive. Now I live in California (garden zone 9b,) and my options are (almost) unlimited. I can grow anything my heart desire, with a little effort. I’m in heaven!

Fruit trees take several years of growing, before they produce fruit. I have been moving more times than I can remember the last six years, lived and worked at several different ranches, and been on a cross country trip with my RV. My semi nomadic, adventurous lifestyle, lead me to start experimenting with  container gardening, a few years back. Now I successfully tried growing; different kinds of peaches, cherries, olives, plums, pomegranates, lemons, and figs in containers.

Last year I decided to sell my whole container garden, it was starting to get BIG in every aspect of the word (the trees were huge and many,) before moving to a new place. This year we’re leasing a property, and I will plant a traditional annual vegetable garden. On the side I’m going to start a new container garden with fruit trees. I planted the first four trees yesterday (photo above. Don’t mind the surrounding mess/weeds, we’re in the middle of moving in to our new house.) I’m focusing on trees that are suitable for our dry/hot climate, like pomegranate, and fig trees. I will plant some other trees, but I’d like the majority to be draught resistant.

I’m trying to think of ways to save water. For the past three years I’ve planted my fruit trees in smart pots, durable grow bags made out of fabric. It’s cheap to get used ones where I live (!) They work great for growing vegetables, and fruit trees. Last year I grew tomato plants that was closer to 10 ft, in 25 gallons smart pots. (Here is a post with some container gardening from last year.) The only thing I was concerned about was all the water that poured out on the ground. I’m sure there is a way to work around that, to save that water. Until I figure out how, I’m going to use self watering pots that water the trees automatically. The first week you water on top, after that you fill up an empty space at the bottom, and the plant uses the water it needs. I’ve tried it indoors with flowers, ten years ago, or so. Using them outside, as a means of saving water is new to me. I will keep you posted about how this method works for different kinds of fruit trees.

I prefer dwarf, or mini dwarf trees, for container gardening. It’s easy to maintain a short tree. You can pick the fruit with ease, prune it, and easily cover it with a net if it need protection from birds. I have tried regular sized trees in containers as well, it works, but you have to train the tree from a young age to the form you like. It’s a little more work, but doable. Just don’t let it get to big in the pot. Depending on the tree, I find that 15-25 gallon containers are most suitable. 25 gallons pots can grow a big, productive tree, but are very heavy to move. I have a heavy duty garden cart to move them on, but it’s still slightly challenging to move the 25 gallon trees by yourself. (I’ve done it many times, that’s why I choose to sell my container garden before moving last summer.) The trees I planted yesterday are in 15 gallon pots. Which will work perfectly for a couple years, until it’s time to replant them anyways (before they get root bound.) One of the most important thing when choosing containers for your fruit trees, is that the container drain well. You don’t want the roots to constantly be wet. They need to dry out in between.

If you have a container garden because of limited space, and you buy your trees at a nursery, pick your trees carefully. Try to pick “cone shaped” trees, with branches growing at a 45 degrees angle upwards. It’s easier to keep training that tree in the right shape, that will save you space. (Naturally you don’t always get to be picky, and that’s fine, you just have to work with what you got.)

I will keep adding trees to my container garden throughout the season, when I get a good deal locally. My goal is to have a variety of fruit trees, so that there is always fresh fruit available, year round. It is actually possible here. I sometimes barter working a few hours on someones place, or with someones horse, towards fruit trees, or fresh produce. The farms and ranches in our area are usually very busy during spring/summer, and appreciate the help. If you want to know what these two strong arms worked with today, check it out on Instagram. (It’s going to be 30ft x 30ft when it’s done.) I assure you I don’t need to hit the gym today, and I won’t have to do it tomorrow either..lol. I love this time of the year!

Are you interested in container gardening? Have you tried it? Do you have a container garden? Are you interested in trying? What type of fruit trees thrive in the climate where you live? Tell me about your garden!

 

Love,

Ms Zen

 

 

Categories: Mindful Living, Minimalism, NorCal, Northern California, Organic GardeningTags: , , , , , , ,

15 thoughts on “Growing Fruit Trees In Containers

    1. Citrus are so beautiful in containers. I might need to get a couple 🙂 I do use a lot of lemon in the kitchen. Many people in the area are growing Meyer Lemons.
      Thank you for your kind comment. I always enjoy looking at the beautiful flowers you post. There’s literally hundreds of different bushes, and flower arrangement planted by the landlord, at our new place. It’s not kept up by previous renter, and there’s a lot of weeding, sorting out to do. We’ll see. I’m going to do my best, take the weeds away as they come, and try to keep it neat.

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    1. Citrus makes such wonderful container fruits. I’m thinking of adding some to my container garden later on. Meyer lemons are the most popular variety here, but there’s all kinds of citrus around us. How wonderful to have fresh lime handy!

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  1. I had a mini-orchard started at our last home. I want to start one here…room is a premium. I thought about espaliering…but the best lit walls have no space. If I had an easily accessible heated space to move things into for the harsh Michigan winters I’d give container a try.

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    1. There is something appealing about having your own orchard. I had around 20 fig and pomegranate trees on our last place. It was tough to leave behind. Some variety’s of hardy fig trees, are easy to care for in pots even in your climate. You can move them next to a wall, and put “bubble wrap” (not sure if that’s the scientific name..you know the wrap you use for shipping,) loosely around the trees, and fill up with leaves, or other insulating material. Cover the whole thing up with a warm blanket, and you should be good. I’m sure there’s other fruits, that I don’t know about, that you could do something similar with. I’d love to hear about it, if you decide to try 🙂 Best of luck with your gardening adventure this spring/summer.

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      1. I’ve potted up a lot of boxwood that we use to define outdoor living spaces and I winter them much as you describe. I am handicapped and limited by how much weight I can move. Thanks! I’d love some nice potted mini fruit trees.

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        1. Wonderful, I bet the Boxwood is very beautiful 🙂 When I started out and didm;t have so many trees, I planted them on tables with wheels, so that I could move them easily, as needed. Best of luck with your trees :0

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